What makes a good abstract?

What makes a good abstract?

Abstracts act as an advertisement for your research or paper, so mastering the art of writing an one is essential for your scientific career. The purpose of an abstract is to summarize your research and tell the reader your motivation, aim, method, findings and conclusions. An important thing to remember: make sure your submission is relevant to the topic of the conference. There’s nothing more frustrating for event organizers than going through abstracts which are not relevant! 

Things to remember as you write your abstract

  • Your abstract should be informative and provide a brief overview of your research
  • Be descriptive: include the research aim, the objectives of your project and the analytical methodologies you used
  • Describe the key outcomes and limitations of your work – this is critical
  • Write in a formal language
  • Be concise, abstracts are typically around 200-250 words

How to write an abstract

When writing your abstract, you need to ensure the key points of your research are expressed without going into long-winded explanations. Structure it in a logical order to help your reader understand why you conducted your study and why it is important. Below is a format that you can use to ensure you hit all the key points. Each point should be 1-2 sentences long.

  1. Background/Motivation – Provide a little background about the project and your motivation for working on it. Think about why the topic is important and why people should care about the research and results.
  2. Aim/Problem – State the problem you are trying to solve and what your goals are. Include a hypothesis if you have one.
  3. Method/Approach – How did you try to solve your problem? What methodologies went into your research?
  4. Results/Findings – Discuss your key findings, the outcome of the study. Did you solve the problem? Were the results close to your hypothesis?
  5. Conclusion – Talk about your findings and their importance. Think about if the results lead to an increase in knowledge, or how the findings will affect the field of study.

Top Tips

  • Write in third person, don’t use words like ‘I’ or ‘We’
  • Write down everything you need, then trim it down to meet the word/character limit
  • Keep it punchy, use short sentences to keep the reader’s attention
  • Choose a simple and powerful title that describes your abstract to capture interest
  • Avoid details and lengthy background information
  • Define abbreviations and acronyms

Once you’ve perfected your abstract with these tips, make sure you submit it before the deadline! [Submit Abstract Link]

What makes a good abstract?

Abstracts act as an advertisement for your research or paper, so mastering the art of writing an one is essential for your scientific career. The purpose of an abstract is to summarize your research and tell the reader your motivation, aim, method, findings and conclusions. An important thing to remember: make sure your submission is relevant to the topic of the conference. There’s nothing more frustrating for event organizers than going through abstracts which are not relevant! 

Things to remember as you write your abstract

  • Your abstract should be informative and provide a brief overview of your research
  • Be descriptive: include the research aim, the objectives of your project and the analytical methodologies you used
  • Describe the key outcomes and limitations of your work – this is critical
  • Write in a formal language
  • Be concise, abstracts are typically around 200-250 words

How to write an abstract

When writing your abstract, you need to ensure the key points of your research are expressed without going into long-winded explanations. Structure it in a logical order to help your reader understand why you conducted your study and why it is important. Below is a format that you can use to ensure you hit all the key points. Each point should be 1-2 sentences long.

  1. Background/Motivation – Provide a little background about the project and your motivation for working on it. Think about why the topic is important and why people should care about the research and results.
  2. Aim/Problem – State the problem you are trying to solve and what your goals are. Include a hypothesis if you have one.
  3. Method/Approach – How did you try to solve your problem? What methodologies went into your research?
  4. Results/Findings – Discuss your key findings, the outcome of the study. Did you solve the problem? Were the results close to your hypothesis?
  5. Conclusion – Talk about your findings and their importance. Think about if the results lead to an increase in knowledge, or how the findings will affect the field of study.

Top Tips

  • Write in third person, don’t use words like ‘I’ or ‘We’
  • Write down everything you need, then trim it down to meet the word/character limit
  • Keep it punchy, use short sentences to keep the reader’s attention
  • Choose a simple and powerful title that describes your abstract to capture interest
  • Avoid details and lengthy background information
  • Define abbreviations and acronyms

Once you’ve perfected your abstract with these tips, make sure you submit it before the deadline!

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